The Joy of Making


Today I was working on an order involving tea lights for a company called Hope Box (www.hopebox.com). Tea lights are simultaneously the easiest and the most difficult type of candle to work with. Easy because they dry the quickest. Difficult because I have fat fingers and they are small! I had a brief thought to myself about a faster way I could put wicks in the tea lights. Then I thought about making a machine that could wick them for me. Finally, I had the thought that I could just buy tea light containers pre-wicked and be done with it! 

After about my 40th wicked tea light, I realized something. My mental game I was playing to find an easier way became less and less appealing because I found myself enjoying the process. I realized what was happening was that I was connecting deeply with my work. With each wicked tea light, I was rewarded with the feeling of being focused and creating something special for somebody.

"Now hang on..." You might say, "It's just a tea-light." The reality is that doing the work myself allows me to fully appreciate the process. To take part in the tedious and the mundane aspects of the business can be just as rewarding as a massive order for a big name store.

One of the things that we have lost as a culture is our connection with the Joy of making. Although we can't make everything we use, we shouldn't sacrifice the joy of making for efficiency. What I am saying is this: avoiding the tedious in favor of an easier route can take from us the joy of making.

Making these lovely tea lights allowed me to meet Derik from Hope Box (www.hopebox.com) and learn that they were going into the hands of people who are going through difficult times. Hope box is an amazing company!

If you would like to send a hope box with a Modern Forestry tea light in it to someone you know who could use encouragement you can use Promo code: FORESTRY to receive 10% off your order!

Thanks for following our story and being a part of this awesome adventure!


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